Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation

DOWNLOAD:
TO DECLARE THE REASONS FOR TRAVELLING: HERE THE SELF-CERTIFICATION FORM (courtesy translation IT>EN)

1- Which are the main rules for travel to/from Italy?

From July 9 to 31, all persons who – in the previous 14 days – travelled to or transited/stayed in the following countries are not allowed to enter Italy, namely: Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic. The only exception to this rule is for Italian citizens or nationals of EU and Schengen Member States, UK,  Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or the Vatican City State and their close family members (cohabiting lineal relatives, spouse, civil or cohabiting partner), provided that they were resident in Italy since before July 9,  2020.
All persons travelling to Italy from any foreign location are required to provide the carrier, or law enforcement officers if they are stopped for checks, a self-declaration that can be downloaded here.

These are the principal new measures in force from July 1:

  • travel within the Member States of the European Union will continue to be unrestricted (in addition to Italy the following Countries are EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden), Schengen Members States (non-EU Countries that are Schengen Members States are: Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland), United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Andorra, Principality of Monaco, Republic of San Marino and the Vatican City State. People travelling to Italy from any of the above Countries will not be required to justify their reasons for travelling and will not be subject to a 14-day quarantine period in self-isolation (unless they stayed in any other Country during the 14 day period prior to travelling to Italy);
  • from July 1, all restrictions on travel to Italy will be lifted with regard to the residents of the following Countries (unless they come from Countries travel from which to Italy is temporarily banned): Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, Republic of Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. In these cases the reasons for travelling will no longer have to be provided;
  • travel to Italy is freely allowed, without having to justify their reasons for travelling, to the citizens of EU Member States, Schengen Member States, United Kingdom, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or the Vatican, as well as foreign nationals residing in the above mentioned States and members of their household (spouse, civil or cohabiting partner, dependent children aged below 21 years, other dependent lineal relatives). Specific restrictions apply to persons who transited or stayed in Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic (see above);
  • travel is allowed to and from any other Countries for reasons of work, health or absolute necessity, or to return home or to one’s place of residence or dwelling, as well as for reasons of study. All other reasons for travelling shall continue to be prohibited;

People travelling to Italy from all Countries other than EU Member States, Schengen Member States, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Island, Andorra, Principality of Monaco, Republic of San Marino or Vatican City State will still be required to observe a 14-day quarantine period in self-isolation, with several exceptions (see FAQs 2 and 3).

Before undertaking travel abroad check the rules and restrictions that apply in the Country of destination or transit.

2 – I have travelled to Italy from abroad. Am I required to self-isolate?

It depends on when you travel to Italy and which Country you are travelling from. If you travel to Italy from June 3, from an EU or Schengen Member State or the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland or Andorra, the Principality of Monaco, the Republic of San Marino or the Vatican City State, you will not be required to self-isolate, provided that you did not stay in a Country other than those listed above prior to 14 days before travelling to Italy. Self-isolation for 14 days remains obligatory if you travel to Italy from any of the following Countries:

  • from any Country except for the following: EU or Schengen Member State or the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland or Andorra, the Principality of Monaco, the Republic of San Marino or the Vatican City State;
  • from any foreign Country (except San Marino and the Vatican), if you stayed in any Country other than the following prior to 14 days before travelling to Italy: EU or Schengen Member State or the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland or Andorra, the Principality of Monaco, the Republic of San Marino or the Vatican City State.

There are, however, exceptions to these rules (see FAQ 3 below).

3 – Which are the exceptions to mandatory self-isolation when travelling to Italy from abroad?

Mandatory self-isolation does not apply to the following persons

  • transport crew members;
  • travel staff members;
  • persons travelling for proven work reasons, if citizens of or resident in one of the following countries: Italy, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland;
  • health personnel travelling to Italy for professional purposes;
  • cross-border workers entering the country to work and then returning home;
  • employees of companies with their main or secondary headquarters in Italy, returning to the country after travelling abroad, for work, for no more than 120 hours (5 days);
  • travel to and from the Republic of San Marino and the Vatican City State;
  • officials and other servants of the European Union, international organisations, diplomatic missions and consulates, military personnel in the performance of their duties;
  • students attending study programmes abroad and returning home at least once a week;
  • persons travelling to Italy for a short stay (up to 120 hours in total) for proven work, urgent or health reasons;
  • transit passengers;
  • persons travelling through the country for no more than 36 hours to reach their country of residence (e.g. entering Italy by ferry from Greece to continue by car to their home in Germany).

From June 3, besides the cases listed above, mandatory self-isolation no longer applies for persons travelling to Italy from the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. However, mandatory self-isolation shall continue to be required if, during the 14-day period prior to entering Italy they had stayed for any length of time in a Country other than those listed above. For example, persons travelling to Italy from France on July 1 will be required to self-isolate if they had travelled to France from the United States, for example, on June 20, but will not be required to self-isolate if they travelled from the United States to France before June 10, or if they stayed in Germany between June 15 and 30.

In any case, persons who – in a 14-day period prior to travelling to Italy – stayed or transited in any of the following countries, are required to observe a 14-day quarantine in self-isolation, namely: Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic. Travel to Italy by people in these circumstances is nevertheless restricted (see FAQ 1).

4 – Can I travel to or from a foreign country for tourism?

From June 3, all travel restrictions (including those applying to tourism) have been dropped to and from the following Countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Principality of Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Travel to and from any other Country for tourism will not be allowed (see FAQ 1 above). Before travelling abroad for tourism, Italian nationals and foreign nationals resident in Italy, are advised to check the Covid-19 measures and restrictions in force in the country of destination and any transit countries. From July 1, the following are also allowed to travel to Italy:

  • citizens of EU Member States, Schengen Member States, United Kingdom, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or the Vatican;
  • foreign nationals residing in EU Member States, Schengen Member States, United Kingdom, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or the Vatican;
  • members of the household of the citizens of the above mentioned States or of foreign nationals residing in the above-mentioned States (spouse, civil or cohabiting partner, dependent children aged below 21 years, other dependent lineal relatives).

However, people travelling to Italy from all Countries other than EU Member States, Schengen Member States, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Island, Andorra, Principality of Monaco, Republic of San Marino or Vatican City State will still be required to observe a 14-day quarantine period in self-isolation.

Specific restrictions apply to persons who stayed or transited in Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic (see FAQ 1).

5 – When am I required to start self-isolating after arriving in Italy, where mandatory?

As a rule, immediately after entering the country. You are only allowed to reach the address where you have chosen to self-isolate, by the shortest possible route and without using any means of public transport other than the means used to travel to Italy (for example, if you fly into Fiumicino Airport you are not allowed to catch a train into Rome or for any other destination). Transit passengers are not required to self-isolate: if you are on a short stopover between flights and do not leave the airport you are free to board a connecting flight to any other domestic or international destination. You may rent a car (with or without a driver) or use a taxi. Furthermore, persons travelling to Italy from abroad for reasons of work, health or absolute necessity may postpone the start of the self-isolation period for up to 120 hours. The delay must be justified by the same reasons that justified your travelling to Italy in the first place. For the cases of exemption from mandatory self-isolation see the previous FAQ 3.

6 – I am a foreign resident and need to pass through Italy to go home. What am I required to do?

Transit through Italy, from one foreign country to another, to return home along the fastest possible route and without intermediate stopovers that are not strictly necessary is allowed. For example:

  • airport transits are allowed (for example, if travelling from Caracas to Frankfurt, with a stopover in Fiumicino), as long as you do not leave the airport;
  • cruise passengers disembarking in Italy at the end of the cruise are allowed to return to the Country where they live (at the expense of the shipowner);
  • ferry passengers with a vehicle (travelling from Tunisia or Greece to Italy, for example), may continue on their vehicle to their home country (the Netherlands or Germany, for example). In this case, they are allowed to remain in Italy for no more than 36 hours.

Before boarding the airplane/ferry to Italy, you will be required to complete a self-certification form (link to Foreign Ministry form) clearly indicating that you are only passing through Italy on your way to your final destination in a foreign country. If you have developed, or develop Covid-19 symptoms while in Italy, you must immediately notify the competent health authorities, by calling the dedicated helplines and await instructions. Before undertaking any travel you are advised to search for information regarding travel restrictions in place in Italy, as well as in the countries of origin, transit, and destination. When travelling through Italy you are advised to keep in touch with your consular authorities. From June 3, there will be no travel restrictions in place to Italy from the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. If during the 14 days prior to entering Italy you spent any length of time in countries other than those listed above, you shall be required to continue to observe the above-mentioned transit rules.

7 – I am travelling to Italy by air. Can I catch a connecting or other flight for another domestic or international destination?

Yes, airport transit is allowed. However, you are not allowed to leave the airport if you are travelling from any Country except the following: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Andorra, Monaco, Republic of San Marino, Vatican City State, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. You are not allowed to leave the airport if you are travelling from any of the above Countries but stayed in a different Country prior to 14 days before the date of travel. Specific restrictions apply to persons who stayed or transited in Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic (see FAQ 1).

8 – I am a foreign / Italian citizen temporarily in Italy. Can I travel to the country where I live?

Yes, travel to return home is always allowed. You are advised to search for information regarding travel restrictions to and in your country of destination, in respect of the Covid-19 emergency. Foreign nationals are also advised to keep in touch with your consular authorities in Italy. Specific restrictions apply to persons who stayed or transited in Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic (see FAQ 1).

9 – I am travelling to Italy from abroad. Can I ask someone to come and pick me up by a car, on arrival at the airport/railway station/port?

Yes, but one person only and only if he or she is a member of your household and is possibly wearing personal protective equipment. However, before departing you are advised to check the Covid-19 measures and restrictions in force in the region of destination. Except if you are exempted for any reason (see FAQ 3 above) you must immediately notify your arrival in Italy to the Disease Prevention Department of your local health authorities and spend a period of time in supervised self-isolation. You must also immediately report the development of Covid-19 symptoms to the health authorities.